MarySmith’sPlace ~ Hacking coughs, fevers and wobbly bits: Cancer Diary #27

Wednesday, 10 March: By last Wednesday evening I sounded like I was trying to cough up my lungs and had a bit of high temperature, fortunately brought down with a couple of paracetamol.

Finished radiotherapy on January 18th – have no idea whether or not it worked

On Thursday I met with a friend for a socially distanced walk. In the spirit of doing shorter walks, as recommended by the oncologist, I suggested we just went to the local park – masses of snowdrops, crocuses and very active swans. The weather forecast, she emailed, said there was a six per cent chance of rain. It arrived as we started out – we were appropriately dressed, hadn’t seen each other for months and had much to talk about so carried on. I think it stopped raining when we ended our walk.

My temperature was raised again in the evening – much higher than the previous night. The DH was making noises about going to A&E or calling whatever the out of hours number is. I took more paracetamol and said I’d see what news GP had next day on the urine test. Of course, it was clear so no UTI. Whatever is causing the temperature spikes is a mystery. The GP prescribed a course of antibiotics. Almost at the end of the course now, there’s no change to the hacking cough so it would seem to be safe to conclude it has nothing to do with whatever infection I have.

On Sunday the DH and I ventured round my on-loan field. I don’t think I stopped coughing and felt I ought to shout tot he fisherman in his boat on the river that I truly don’t have Covid.

There was snow across the water last time we were here.

When the specialist nurse called today he asked if I’d heard anything about the brought-forward scan appointment. When I said I’d heard nothing he looked it up on the system – and found I was booked in for April 12. That would be the original scan date, 12 weeks after the end of treatment. This is not a brought-forward date! He says he’ll look into it. And will I get bloods done after I finish the antibiotics?

Right now, I said I need something which will suppress the cough for an hour or so while I deliver the creative writing workshops. In fact, right now, I doubt if I could lie still on my back for the scan without coughing. He has asked the GP to prescribe a ‘simple linctus’ – which he did. To be honest, it’s not going to make any more difference to my cough than Manuka honey, boiling water and malt whisky. I do promise that I will find a way to not cough throughout the workshops.

I forgot to mention last week (probably deliberately because I’m so mortified) I was weighed when I went to meet the oncologist and, since I started chemotherapy in September 2020, I have gained over a stone and half in weigh – 21 pounds – no idea what it is in kilos, which is actually what they weigh me in. This is not steroid-induced. This is weight gained because I’ve hardly exercised like I did before when five or six miles several times a week was the norm – and I’ve fallen into the habit/trap of allowing myself treats, lots and lots of treats.

It has all gone on around my tummy, creating the classic apple shape which is so unhealthy and carries higher risks of health issues such as heart disease and/or Type 2 diabetes. Like having lung cancer isn’t enough. My jeans, trousers and skirts are all way too tight and I really don’t want to buy a bigger size – not quite ready to give in.

I’m thinking about this and how long it will take to lose the weight I’ve gained over six months and I reckon it will take at least a year of healthy eating (cutting out the killer treats) and proper, regular exercise (which is a bit of a problem as I am permanently knackered). That’s a long time. I don’t know if I have that much time – and if I do, do I really want to deny myself, chocolate, ice cream, tablet….? Even more so if I don’t.

Then, another thought pulls me up sharp. My funeral. I’m fine about there being a need for one, sooner than I once expected. It’s not the being dead and cremated which bothers me – no, specifically, it’s the funeral director. I live in a small town. I’ve known him practically all my life. He’s a lovely guy. He’s patted my shoulder and hugged me at funerals. His wee brother was in the same class as Wee-sis. Now, a first class roofer who has clambered over my roof many a time, he was a naughty boy in school. His sister was a year above me at school and I was so in awe of her sophistication and older boyfriend. Next generation down, I took her daughter on her first ever job as a local newspaper photographer. Thinking about it, she drove. Their dad ran a sweetie shop which we kids loved – then he opened a sports shop which my dad loved better.  

Bad enough my funeral director friend would see me naked at any time – so much worse when I’m a stone and a half overweight with wobbly bits. Wee-sis says he could promise to keep his eyes shut as he says he did for a friend with the same dilemma a few years ago. Do we believe him? When he retires his gorgeous daughter will take over completely – she’s so slim – hope she doesn’t judge!

I guess city folk don’t have this problem. The funeral director is probably a total stranger who has seen more wobbly bits than the rest of us have had hot dinners. And, I do know logically when the time comes for him to get me into that casket I won’t know a thing about it and won’t hear see his surprised expression – he wouldn’t comment, surely – about my wobbly bits.

I didn’t meet any lambs this week so enjoy the splashes on colour in the garden.

Pleased to capture the cat, who is not usually amenable to having her photo taken

114 thoughts on “MarySmith’sPlace ~ Hacking coughs, fevers and wobbly bits: Cancer Diary #27

  1. Wonderful writing as always. Coherent and transparent, open and honest. Lovely images at the end of this piece. Keep going Mary, we love your writing but don’t knock your pan out for us. Live and love as you want. Xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Susan. I’m glad you enjoy the writing – and the photos bringing a spot of colour at the end. If I could get something done about the cough (apart from slitting my throat) I’d feel a lot more cheerful about facing the future. xx

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  2. I am sitting here and trying to think of excellent advice on the funeral director seeing you naked with jiggly bits. I finally came to it. You have to look him in the eye and make him promise not to look. You have a veiled threat of haunting that you can hold over him. I think there would be no person on Earth who would tempt that fate. Lovely spring flowers. I’m glad you were able to get out with a friend.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. Thank you for the update, Mary. I’m sorry to hear that your nasty cough continues. I hope the doc can give you something to relieve it.

    Your cat looks to be in stalking mode: field mouse, mole, vole, unsuspecting neighbor dog?

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  4. Pretty spring bulbs, always so cheering to see. And being a cat lover, I noticed your little one right away. 🙂
    Don’t worry about the weight, what’s life without treats, hey? (But you might go easy on the sugar, I’ve heard C-cells love it.)
    I’m sure your funeral director has seen it all, and acts professionally at all times. 🙂
    Hope that nasty cough lets up and your lectures go smoothly! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Despite the weather not being even slightly warm, the spring flowers are bursting into flower day by day. Like me, the cat prefers warm weather 🙂 It will come.
      If the cough would ease off life would be much easier. And, yes, I know the funeral director will be totally professional.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I worked in a funeral parlor for a couple years and I promise you the only one who made jokes was me and I never saw a naked body. (ahem) Moving right along… Love the flowers and the car caught unaware. Shall send magical healing energy to the cough and some elastic! ❤

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  6. Take part in the Women Over 50 photo project, Mary – it’ll help you past your self consciousness about the shape of your body.
    (Sorry, hope I didn’t induce another coughing fit…)
    Seriously though, buy bigger jeans – surely comfort overrides other concerns.
    Or go for the full tracky bottoms 🙂

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      • The trick is to take part when you’re at your largest, so the FD will either be already prepared, or be impressed with how much weight you lost after…
        Meanwhile, happy to chat further about it once 2nd jabs have been had 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  7. God, you’re hilarious – I’ll come and lay you out, just not yet awhile. I used to ‘see too’ folk, at work and in our rural village. Mary, it would be a privilege to come out of retirement for you! But I’m sure your local friend will treat you with reverence. In the meantime make him wait to lay hands on you and keep plodding on and jiggling the new wobbly bits. Love the splash of mauve. big hugs.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh, thank you, Steph – that’s good to know 🙂 Makes me think of Annie Black who was the last tenant of one of the flat at what is now the Old Bridge House Museum in Dumfries. She was always called on to heIp deliver babies and lay out the dead. I know the funeral director will be totally professional and respectful – doesn’t mean I’m ready for him to see me naked 🙂

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  8. Sorry to hear about the ongoing cough, Mary. Really hope it stops soon. Loving the pics of crocuses. So pleased you enjoyed your socially distanced walk, despite the rain. As ever, thank you for sharing your news – wobbly bits and all!

    Liked by 2 people

    • The cough is seriously driving me up the wall, Wendy. It’s relentless and it’s exhausting. Have been prescribed a cough linctus now so fingers crossed it helps. I’m sure warm sunshine would help, too 🙂

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    • If I could get rid of the cough, Kim, life would be so much easier. Yeah, I don’t think I’m alone in obsessing over the wobbly bits the funeral director will see 🙂 If it was someone totally unknown it might not be so bad.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I really admire your courage Mary! Thinking of wobbly bits and funeral arrangements with comic thoughts! Though we all have to do it when time comes. In our society, only women can do it for women and vise versa. I do hope Your cough goes away soon. Perhaps hydration will help?
    All the best.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Sadje. I did know about how these things are done in your country (I think I said lived for several years in Pakistan) but you have now got me wondering when things changed here. At one time, not so long ago, it would be a woman who would prepare the body for the funeral – but that would not be allowed now. It is all done on a very commercial basis.
      I have some cough medicine to try to fingers crossed it works.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. It’s a nightmare when you can’t get any answers. I have no doubt that waiting until April 12th feels like an eternity.

    My weight vacillates between 101 – 112 pounds, according to when the bouts of gastroparesis hit. My sister and my daughter are heavy. Were it not for gastroparesis, I would be 200 pounds, too. I can’t eat fried food (like French fries and fried chicken), broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage or brussel sprouts, and pork — it doesn’t “set well” on my stomach. Once in a while, I can have pizza. Then there are the times where all I can stomach is a liquid supplement because my gut has a mind of its own an won’t all anything else to stay down. Gastroparesis is not fatal, but it can be a pain.

    If you can eat, enjoy the foods you love for as long as you can. It’s one of your few pleasures at this time. When you’re able to walk more, you will.

    Liked by 1 person

    • April 12 does sound an eternity away, Joelle, especially as the scan dates was supposed to be brought forward and hasn’t been.
      Sorry about the gastroparesis. I had to look up exactly what that is and it sounds dreadful to live with. I don’t think my weight has ever been as low as yours (possibly when I had tuberculosis – but as soon as I was on medication and eating, my weight went back to normal). Yes, I can eat and – touch wood – I can eat most things without causing any upset stomach or acid reflux – I just get wobbly bits! I’m sure if the weather warms up I’ll be able to do more (the cat stands at the door and looks at me like it’s my fault it’s raining again).

      Liked by 1 person

  11. The funeral director… The problem you describe was the same one my auntie Mary faced back in 1983. She’d known Tommy Johnson all her life. I think there’d even been a ‘connection’. She didn’t want to be named under his gaze. In the event, she went with ‘professional discretion’ and stuck with Tommy. I think he will have been tender and solicitous, as she knew him to be, in life.

    My own (limited) exposure to indignity came when I was due to have testicular surgery as a 19 year old, and had to be shaved, naturally enough. I lay there, a chubby student (too much pie, chips and beer; not enough dancing), as the nursing assistant approached.

    Now he was at the bedside, about to get up close and personal with my penis and scrotum. Something of a treat for a gay man in more usual circumstances. Not now, though.

    Particularly since it was Dave Greenwood, classmate of the preceding eight years, and his dad was the Biology teacher.

    The absurdity of it was thrown in to even sharper relief as we chatted nonchalantly whilst David held my floppy penis delicately in between finger and thumb, and diligently shaved around it with his orange Bic. Nowadays they probably have some sort of strimmer for that. Or they’d simply give you the Bic and tell you to get busy. But what would life be without a brew and a catch up?

    Re cough; do pastilles help? Good job re flowers and the reticent cat.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I can empathise with your auntie Mary’s dilemma (not that I have had a ‘connection’ like she may have) . As for your own indignity dilemma, I apologise but reading it did make me laugh out loud. Just be grateful your penis remained floppy under Dave Greenwood’s ministrations with the orange Bic!
      I’ve been trying all kinds of pastilles and honey and hot toddies and gargles and everything you can think of. I’m now starting on a simple linctus the specialist nurse asked the GP to prescribe. It’s exhausting.

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  12. Never mind the wobbly bits—I find it so comforting that someone who knows and likes me me would look after me. I also know our funeral director, it was such a consolation to have him there when my mother died. Trust me, he would look at you with respect and love. Meanwhile, hope that blasted cough goes away—I used to have them occasionally, and I know they’re exhausting.
    Lovely spring flowers, they do lift the spirits, don’t they? Hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You are right, Marina, I know he will be respectful and professional – and I’ll no longer be caring about the wobbly bits.
      The cough is driving me crazy! Trying a new cough medicine.
      I love seeing my spring bulbs come bursting into colour – despite it still be so cold. Hugs back.

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  13. Hi Mary. I find I cough more if I eat lots of dairy and acidic foods. As I don’t eat much of these anymore due to the acid reflux they produce, I don’t cough. Could your increase in ‘treat’ eating be causing you to cough? A homeopathic natural mineral based powder dissolved in water has helped me a great deal with my acid reflux and thereby my cough.
    Lovely colour and life in your photos, as in you. Take care, xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m afraid it is looking more likely that the cough is being caused by scar tissue from the radiotherapy, Kim. I have to wait for the scan before we know for sure. I’m probably eating less dairy again – for a while I was having sweet milky coffees although normally I take mine black without sugar, but when throat was so sore, it slipped down more easily. I’m hoping they can find a cancellation or something so I can get the scan sooner rather than wait for another month.
      Yes, at least, I have my spring flowers to brighten things up 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I have never worried about wobbly bits before!! My ‘thing’ has been label fastened to big toe – so undignified. I’ve even threatened the family that, if they let anyone fasten a label to my big toe, I will come back and haunt them. Now I have to worry about our local funeral director seeing my wobbly bits also.. Well, thank you so much, Mary Smith! On the ‘being a nice friend’ side of things, I hope the cough gets sorted, you enjoy more short walks with your real life friend, you enjoy your treats, and your workshop is a great success ( sure it will be). Love the photos. Love your humour and slant on life. Take good care of yourself – sending good vibes from Wales to Scotland. x

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sorry to have given you something else to worry about Judith! Have to say I hadn’t given the label on the big toe a thought but now… And what to wear? I hope I have something in my wardrobe I can still fit in.
      The cough will be supressed for the workshop, one way or another!
      Thanks for the good vibes from Wales – returning them from Scotland. xx

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  15. So lovely to see colour appearing in the garden.
    A continuous cough must be very wearying, I hope they can give you something that helps. As for the weight gain and wobbly bits, I’m with you there-an under active thyroid see to that (unless I half starve myself and it’s hard to keep that up)

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s surprising how much colour is appearing as it’s still really cold here. It would be good if the weather warmed up a bit. Sorry about the under-active thyroid. I thought I had that years ago when I was piling on weight and permanently exhausted. GP had blood tested, came back negative. She examined me and said I had a nasty layer of fat round my tummy and while she was sure I had a healthy diet she was also sure I had a very sedentary lifestyle. That’s when I first understood about the risks of having an apple shape. I started walking then and eventually the excess weigh came off – which is why I’m so miffed at putting it all back again in just a few months.
      Oh, maybe we’re meant to have wobbly bits 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Excercise definitely helps. Since the brginning of the pandemic we haven’t done nearly as much walking as previously and also losing our dog hasn’t helped. Hopefully we’ll be getting another soon and the walking will be abck to normal. Probably still have wobbly bits though 😉

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  16. Oh the wobbly bits! And the size increase! And I have no excuses other than a sweet tooth, feeling sorry for myself and a lifelong addiction to over-eating. And I get along well for three days in a row before suddenly a cheesecake appears in the fridge one lunchtime and suddenly it’s disappeared again before bedtime.
    I keep making myself promises, and pacts… but I’ve never thought of the problem of someone I know laying me out.
    He’ll see the former you, I’m sure. He knows how ill you’ve been.
    Roscoe had his lump off on Monday as scheduled. He’s not doing too well at the moment, but it’s his age I’m afraid. In theory he should be fine, and Biggles, who we found out has a chronic heart condition, has every right to be poorly – but he’s found a new lease of life with his new heart meds. Maybe Roscoe is sulking because he didn’t have complete and undivided attention?
    Back to the vet for a check-up tomorrow.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I can hide a chocolate bar and when I go to look for it, it has already been eaten 🙂
      I’m sorry about the news of Roscoe and hope the vet will give him a clean bill of health tomorrow. Glad Biggles is doing well on his heart meds. You don’t really think Roscoe is sulking do you?

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      • ‘Sulking’ is a word for ‘down in the dumps what have you done to me I feel rotten’ which is pretty much how he is. He’s a bit better this evening. Trouble is, 6 is quite old, and many don’t respond well to anaesthetic anyway, so I was much more worried than I let on. He’s lost some weight, but I’m feeding him extra. But compared to the other older boys I’ve had, he’s fine. 6 is pretty much 84 in human equivalent…
        And he’s just had this evening’s meds and he’s active and looking around for food, which is good 🙂
        I know about those disappearing chocolate bars too. The ones that sing to you from their hiding places!

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  17. Once you get the all clear Mary, you can cut back just a little on the comfort food but in the meantime pamper yourself and enjoy each day. Have an extra helping of chocolate ice cream. Remember without those jiggly bits we wouldn’t be cuddly, warm females that may well become fashionable again. Take care love and hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think a lot of the treat eating is actually comfort eating while waiting to find out whether or not the treatment has been successful. I really hope I don’t have to wait another month to find out. Chocolate ice cream sounds good – haven’t had chocolate for a while.

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  18. Back in the day, the nuns used to lecture us about wearing proper undergarments, and the ultimate mortal sin of getting hit by a car whilst wearing safety-pinned knickers. Then one day a girl raised her hand and said if she was dead, she was pretty sure she wouldn’t care about the state of her panties. Her mother was a doctor and from what she’d heard, underwear is very likely not to be April-fresh after a trauma anyway. And if she wasn’t dead yet, the emergency medical staff would have much bigger things to worry about. Then she looked straight at the teacher and said, “You know, Sister, they’re going to see you without clothes or even your veil. And when they do, I don’t think anyone will be judging you for your underwear.”
    Your friend the funeral director sends everyone off from the skin out. If he’s a professional, he’ll the very one most concerned about getting each customer ready to go out in as much style as possible.
    Meanwhile…chocolate! Of course.

    Liked by 3 people

    • What a wonderful story, Barb. How did the Sister react? I know the funeral director will be totally professional – and maybe I’ll have time to work on the wobbly bits 🙂
      Yes, to chocolate and Jemima has now given me a notion for cheesecake!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve been prescribed some kind of linctus – hasn’t helped so far but I’ll persevere. I think a hot toddy is as likely to be effective. It really is exhausting now. Somehow around 1am it seems to ease off to le me sleep – or maybe I’m just drunk – until the morning.

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  19. Have planned your funeral? Always thought that must be a bit weird but mum insisted on the choice of three songs. There was no way she said that she’d let me loose on choosing believing I would probably go for Going Underground by the Jam.

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    • I haven’t planned it all. Sue has done more planning than I have but when I came to start thinking about it, it was the wobbly bits that came to mind first. I can understand your mum not being thrilled by Going Underground. I was a funeral where the song they played us out to was Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go. I still find it an odd choice but maybe it was for someone special who got the message?

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  20. Life is a bowl of cherries – with ice cream underneath, and perhaps some hot fudge. This is what we need sometimes to get through LIFE and all of its challenges. To heck with your wobbly bits. You, my friend, have earned them. I found your story about your local funeral direction, and all the connections you have with him, so lovely and funny and yet not. I understand your concern, but truthfully, I don’t believe he’ll see your wobbly bits. Your spirit will be in a higher brighter more joyful place. YOU will be nowhere around. But in the meantime (and may it be a long meantime, Mary) eat the sweets and as your cough gets better and the weather warmer, return to the walks, just maybe a mile instead of miles. Your spring flowers will brighten everything inside and outside of you. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ah, thank you, Pam for your lovely wise words. You are right, of course. I won’t actually see him noticing my wobbly bits 🙂 Fingers crossed for warmer weather – everything feels better when there is warmth in the sunshine. xx

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  21. So sorry to hear about the bad cough. I do hope you get some reprieve. It is funny what we worry about. A few extra pounds is the least of our worries. As for the funeral director, I´m sure he will have seen much worse and is very professional about it all. Perhaps we concentrate on these sort of things to keep our mind off of other things. I know I often do. The spring flowers are so lovely and the cat caught on camera is precious. Sending hugs. xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Darlene. I hope the cough starts to get better soon but I’m worried I won’t know what is causing it until the scan – and so far, that has not been brought any further forward. You’re right, a few extra pounds don’t matter – and they don’t look so bad when I’m lying flat 🙂
      I’m surprised the spring flowers are doing so well as it’s still very cold here. It was 9C today. Doesn’t feel like spring. Hugs back, my friend.

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  22. Lovely spring flowers to brighten things up. Glad you’ve retained your sense of humour re your wobbly bits – sadly the weight gain is common, I’m still struggling to lose mine. I do find though that the bits look far better when your laying down to maybe the funeral director won’t notice! Hope the cough eases soon, take care xx

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    • I was so surprised to learn that weight gain is so common amongst people with cancer. The nurse in Edinburgh told me it’s a bit of a myth that cancer patients lose their appetites and become really thin. Steroids, of course, can increase the appetite but so, too, can some of the chemotherapy drugs: all before we get to the having a wee treat to cheer ourselves up stage.
      The cough is the biggest problem at the moment – driving me mad. xx

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  23. Mary I’m the apple of all apple shapes and so far it hasn’t claimed me. As to the funeral parlour you’ll either be completely oblivious to it or you’ll be off somewhere delivering some creative writing extravaganza. Either way you’ll be remembered for the inside of you, not the outside bits, and anyway I’m hoping funeral parlours are a good bit off yet. Having said all that, yes, I’d be worried about exactly the same thing!!!!! xxx

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    • I’m sure when I’ve reached the funeral parlour, I’ll no longer be aware of where I am or who is looking at me. That still doesn’t stop me dwelling on the wobbly bits being seen by someone who has known me for years. And I know it’s daft 🙂

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  24. Oh the dreaded wobbly bits, of which I have far too many. I’ve told Phil to dig a hole in the garden for me as I’d like to be with the cats we’ve done the same for. I hope you get that cough sorted out soon for the lecture. Thinking of you always. 😘

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think the hole in the garden is possible but I’m afraid Phil can’t just dig it himself. I think the undertaker has to still do the funeral bit. He was telling me not so long ago about burying a farmer in a field in front of his house, which I hadn’t realised was allowed. Anyway, I guess by the time we’re at the burial stage wobbly bits will no longer be a concern – I hope 🙂

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  25. I always enjoy your posts Mary, but the comments are the icing on the cake… there has been a lot of discussion about wobbly bits and I can tell you at over 24 stone back in my 40s I was terrified of dying.. not for the usual reason but that I would be laid out on a slab like they have in the crime shows.if they could find one big enough..Now even thought I still have plenty of wobbly bits I thankfully do not know the funeral director who will be dealing with them so don’t feel so bad. You have spoken often about seeing your bulbs flower that you planted and lovely to see the photos and the cat.. I hope the linctus begins to ease the cough and you get that scan soon…and stay away from the yellow bics…hugs ♥

    Liked by 1 person

    • It seems I am not alone in worrying about exposing my wobbly bits when I’ve gone! Love the way so many others have admitted to having similar concerns. It’s been lovely to see the bulbs come into flower – wish it was warmer, though. The weather is far from spring-like, here. Is it the same with you? Hugs.

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          • Sorry the cough is not improving..they mentioned it was scar tissue and that might be improved with some specific deep breathing exercises with a physio.. I would imagine they will want to see the results of the scan before going that route.. I hope the iron helps with the oomph.. takes three or four days to begin to see some pick up.. I am so over this winter. apart from a few brief weeks last summer the sun has been largely absent and I am hoping that this year will be different.. Good luck next week with your talk… hugs ♥

            Liked by 1 person

            • It might be scar tissue – but it might not. They are (I suppose rightly) very reluctant to commit to naming the cause until the scan! The consultant’s last report says I have good air entry throughout both lung fields, oxygen sats 99% with no significant change on exertion. Going for more bloods tomorrow to see if there is any sign of infection. I’m sure a few days of warm sun would do as much good as anything they can prescribe!

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  26. You’ve got us all thinking about wobbly bits, Mary. I agree with everybody, and I’m sure the undertaker will take extra care, and you can spare yourself the extra worry (Wake Me Up Before You Go Go… that’s an interesting choice. It would make me laugh, I think, and perhaps that was the point…).
    I know you prefer to be outdoors, but I wonder if any of the YouTube fitness videos might appeal to you. There are all kinds of things (I tend to chop and change, depending on my mood and my level of energy), and there are some walking ones, low impact workouts, stretching, sitting on a chair, Pilates, strength, yoga, tai-chi, and some as short as 5 or 10 minutes, so they might be an option, especially in bad weather. And some of the instructors are really engaging and cater to over 40s and over 50s as well.
    I hope the cough gets better, and it doesn’t bother you during your workshops.
    The garden is looking fabulous. Thanks for sharing it and keep going. ♥

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    • And when the time comes, Olga, I realise our wobbly bits won’t even register 🙂 I try to keep up Pilates. During the first lockdown my teacher moved the class online and it has worked well. I got out of the habit over the last few weeks, mainly because of the cough, but I will get back to it. Thanks for your support, Olga.

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  27. It may be some small consolation that you are not alone with the wobbly bits Mary. My bits are growing nicely too. Sorry to hear about the nasty cough and your worries re: the funeral director. It’s so you to think of offending with your wobbly bits. Yesterday I heard via my daughter about someone else who has been diagnosed with cancer. Upsetting news. Wish and pray for you all. Marje x

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  28. Some of us have wobbly bits without a good reason. I’m walking around the garden more [over an acre], and telling myself that every little bit counts. 😉 Do what you love doing, and kilos be damned! -hugs-

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Pingback: I decided to NEVER write fiction again~ Guest Post by @marysmithwriter #humor #writing | Barb Taub

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